macnamania

 

Every day life

As a secondary school teacher, my schedule is pretty much the school schedule. During the week what little time I don’t spend at school is usually spent sleeping. Which, by the way, I get plenty of. It’s easy to get a full night’s sleep when you don’t have electricity. Did you know that humans didn’t begin having problems with sleep deficiency until the invention of the light bulb found its way into the home? I read that somewhere recently. I think it was in an issue of Men’s Health that I inherited from a previous volunteer. So you can all blame your lack of sleep on Mr. Franklin. I on the other hand, am very well rested.

Anyway, back to my average day…

I usually wake up somewhere between 6 and 7 am. When the sun has found its way into my bedroom and the roosters can no longer be ignored. Also there is a parade of children that goes marching by my house,called by a school bell, because they have to be at school much earlier than I do. Those are the primary school students. I think they start classes at 7, we don’t start until 8.

You don’t really want to hear about me brushing my teeth, so I’ll skip ahead to school.

My school schedule is different from day to day, I teach anywhere from 2 periods to 6 periods a day,and we have 9 40 minute periods total.

In the middle of the morning we have chai break – time for tea and “bites” which are some variation of fried bread goodness, sometimes resembling in taste a donut or soft pretzel. Chai break is scheduled for 20 minutes but often lasts closer to 30 or even 40 minutes because it is also a time for us teachers to get announcements from the headmaster or do any last minute lesson planning before class.

After 7th period we have an hour lunch break,and then the last two periods of the day.

When I don’t have classes I can be found in the teachers’ office planning lessons, helping students with physics or math questions, chatting with the other teachers, or studying up on the physics subjects that didn’t find their way into my college career, but somehow show up in the TZ secondary school exams – like what a transistor is used for, semiconductors, and ray diagrams for every type of lens or mirror imaginable. Oh, and thermodynamics – how is it that I never really had to study thermodynamics? Well I am now.

After 9th period the students have various activities like sports, clubs, and chores, and if all my work is finished for the next day – grading and lesson planning – and I am not completely exhausted, I play frisbee with the students or watch netball matches or volleyball matches.

After school is time to take care of any chores before it gets dark – go to the store or market in town, wash dishes, wash clothes, wash me, check to make sure my drinking water supply isn’t low, and if it is boil more.

I make dinner – heavy on the vegetables because meat requires a trip to town and doesn’t keep. During the week, since I get lunch at school and it fills me up, I usually make something like soup that lasts two or three days. It’s a good way to use up any vegetables that are probably not going to make it to see another day. After chasing Askari, the body-heat-and-people-food seeking kitten away so that I can eat in peace, I read, write letters, or listen to music until I fall asleep somewhere between 9 and 10 pm.

I don’t really have an average weekend, it might consist of any of the following:
visiting neighbors
visiting other volunteers
market days
cleaning and baking bread
football matches
traveling to Lushoto for “big city”perks like the post office, bank, internet, bigger stores and American food and company.

Comments: 1 Comment

One Comment on “Every day life”

  1. macnamania Says:

    […] Every Day Life – “When I don’t have classes I can be found in the teachers’ office planning lessons, helping students with physics or math questions, chatting with the other teachers, or studying up on the physics subjects that didn’t find their way into my college career, but somehow show up in the TZ secondary school exams – like what a transistor is used for, semiconductors, and ray diagrams for every type of lens or mirror imaginable. Oh, and thermodynamics – how is it that I never really had to study thermodynamics? Well I am now.“ […]

Comment:

 
You can subscribe via RSS 2.0 feed to this post's comments. You can comment below, or link to this permanent URL from your own site.